kateoplis:

Nardò Ring, Nardò, Italy

Amazon Rainforest deforestationPara, Brazil

Terraced rice paddies, Yunnan, China

Soybean fields, São Domingos, Brazil 

Mount Whaleback Iron Ore Mine, Pilbara, Australia

Alang Ship-breaking yards, Gujarat, India

Plasticulture / Greenhouses, Almeria, Spain

Oil Extraction Wells, Texas

Vineyards, Huelva, Spain

Daily Overview

Reblogged from mucholderthen, 1,632 notes, April 23, 2014

bunnyfood:

(via)

(Source: ringswald)

Reblogged from bunnyfood, 36,222 notes, April 22, 2014

milesian:

Dancing in the dark
Three views of one animal look like a magical dancing sprite in the night sea. A relative of the Man-o’-War, the predatory siphonophore Rhizophysa, is four inches high when contracted (middle) but its stinging tentacles stretch to a couple of feet when fishing. 

milesian:

Dancing in the dark

Three views of one animal look like a magical dancing sprite in the night sea. A relative of the Man-o’-War, the predatory siphonophore Rhizophysa, is four inches high when contracted (middle) but its stinging tentacles stretch to a couple of feet when fishing. 

(Source: science-is-everything)

Reblogged from freshphotons, 6,359 notes, April 22, 2014

delicious-designs:

21 Ideas For Energy-Boosting Breakfast Toasts

Lately for me it’s been peanut butter, wheat germ, and cinnamon sugar. Gnom gnom.

delicious-designs:

21 Ideas For Energy-Boosting Breakfast Toasts

Lately for me it’s been peanut butter, wheat germ, and cinnamon sugar. Gnom gnom.

Reblogged from delicious-designs, 145 notes, April 21, 2014

mucholderthen:

Make a #GlobalSelfie with NASA on Earth Day
via NASA’s Earth Right Now campaign

NASA invites you — and everyone else on the planet — to take part in a worldwide celebration of Earth Day this year.

The year 2014 is a big one for NASA Earth science. Five NASA missions designed to gather critical data about our home planet are launching to space this year.

NASA is marking this big year for Earth science with a campaign called Earth Right Now, and as part of this campaign the agency is asking for your help this Earth Day, April 22.

While NASA satellites constantly look at Earth from space,
  • on Earth Day we’re asking you to step outside
    and take a picture of yourself wherever you are on Earth.
  • Then post it to social media using the hashtag #GlobalSelfie.

Read more …

You can download a sign to print out and hold when you take your selfie.  
Available now are:

English (JPG | PDF)

العربية (JPG | PDF)

Bahasa Indonesia (JPG | PDF)

Deutsch (JPG | PDF)

Español (JPG | PDF)

Français (JPG | PDF)

한국어 (JPG | PDF)

עִבְרִית (JPG | PDF)

日本語 (JPG | PDF)

Nederlands (JPG | PDF)

Português (JPG | PDF)

Reblogged from mucholderthen, 35 notes, April 21, 2014

vintagegal:

Victim of Volcano Eruption in Pompeii 79 AD

vintagegal:

Victim of Volcano Eruption in Pompeii 79 AD

Reblogged from decepticonnolly, 272 notes, April 18, 2014

anglosexual:

dubstepsunset:

a-gramme-is-better-than-a-damn:

friendlyatheist:

ilovecharts:

Hours Worked On Minimum Wage In Order To Pay For One University Credit Hour

Wtf

what tf

I love when parents and other older individuals are like oh college was expensive for us too and look we got through it just fine!!

this is how we should measure tuition rates

anglosexual:

dubstepsunset:

a-gramme-is-better-than-a-damn:

friendlyatheist:

ilovecharts:

Hours Worked On Minimum Wage In Order To Pay For One University Credit Hour

Wtf

what tf

I love when parents and other older individuals are like oh college was expensive for us too and look we got through it just fine!!

this is how we should measure tuition rates

Reblogged from mucholderthen, 21,348 notes, April 17, 2014

Reblogged from onlylolgifs, 1,758 notes, April 17, 2014

sixpenceee:

Because you just need this gifset of Linda Blair having her demonic contacts inserted on the set of The Exorcist 

Reblogged from wookieewithabeard, 10,556 notes, April 17, 2014

proofmathisbeautiful:

This is Your Brain on Engineering (GoldieBlox Easter PSA)

At age 2, girls start to identify with their gender. Or, more accurately, all kids start to understand that they have a gender, and become more aware of the social influences for how they should act as a result. In our culture, there are narrow blueprints called “boy” and “girl” that dictate to us all what is and is not the “right” way to act. These blueprints are pretty limiting — “boys don’t cry” and “girls are princesses” aren’t exactly the greatest life mottos. Gendered influences come from everywhere around kids: their parents, their friends, their teachers, the games they play, the movies they watch, the books they read… the list is endless, and all of it sends a message, sometimes negative and often limiting, about what is and isn’t a “girl thing” or a “boy thing.”

I wish I had these when I was a kid, or at least some kinex sheesh.

Reblogged from gender-and-science, 1,882 notes, April 16, 2014

not-poignant:

beneviolentskytreader:

"Creation"

working on a piece to go with this 

Guys, guys, guys, you need to start following beneviolentskytreader for some kickass artwork. I mean it. Look at that. I started following Beneviolent ages ago, and basically get these sweet artworks on my dash that are always interesting and beautiful and brighten my day or leave me thinking or have me staring for ages (like this one did).

Go check them out!

Reblogged from iguanamouth, 21,425 notes, April 16, 2014

lewisandquark:

Sometimes the view under an electron microscope can be positively scary.  I’ll be scrolling along at low magnification, checking out some nanoscale features, when all of a sudden a colossus will loom huge above the nanolandscape.  Sometimes I actually jump.  Usually it’s a tiny microscopic speck of dust, shaped like a mountain or a monster or a sail.  This is one of the largest I’ve seen, maybe a clothing fiber or a carpet fiber - it’s maybe 1/5 the thickness of a single hair.  Fortunately, this monster’s presence wasn’t a problem, since I was only testing an etching recipe.

lewisandquark:

Sometimes the view under an electron microscope can be positively scary.  I’ll be scrolling along at low magnification, checking out some nanoscale features, when all of a sudden a colossus will loom huge above the nanolandscape.  Sometimes I actually jump.  Usually it’s a tiny microscopic speck of dust, shaped like a mountain or a monster or a sail.  This is one of the largest I’ve seen, maybe a clothing fiber or a carpet fiber - it’s maybe 1/5 the thickness of a single hair.  Fortunately, this monster’s presence wasn’t a problem, since I was only testing an etching recipe.

Reblogged from lewisandquark, 17 notes, April 15, 2014

mucholderthen:

SOURCE: ZEN PENCILS

mucholderthen:

SOURCE: ZEN PENCILS

Reblogged from mucholderthen, 63 notes, April 14, 2014

mucholderthen:

THE ECOLOGY OF BACTERIOPHAGES

Studies have shown that bacteriophages (viruses that attack bacteria) are numerically the most abundant biological entities on the planet. [Bacteria themselves are the most abundant life form.]

In shotgun sequencing of marine samples, the majority of phage gene sequences are invariably found to be novel (that is, they don’t correspond to any already known gene sequences).

Hence, the bulk of genetic diversity on the planet may well be tied up in viral/phage “dark matter.” (source)

HOW PHAGES WORK
Phages are quite specific. They attack only the strain of bacteria they evolved to inhabit and kill. And they only attack bacteria: other types of organisms lack the receptors required for phage infection.  

No currently known bacteria are unaffected by phages. (This isn’t saying a lot, since we now know that most bacteria aren’t able to be studied in lab conditions.)

  • [Image 1] Phages first attach to and puncture the bacterial membrane. Phage DNA is injected into the host cell. © Medi-Mation Ltd/Science Source
  • [Image 2] The host cell’s DNA transcription is suppressed, and phage-specific proteins are synthesized instead. © Medi-Mation Ltd/Science Source
  • [Image 3] New phages are assembled, the host cell membrane is disrupted, and large numbers of new phages are released from the host bacterium, which dies. © Medi-Mation Ltd/Science Source

There are somewhere between 1030 and 1032 phages in the biosphere.
It’s estimated that there are 
1023 phage infections of bacteria every second.

In the course of any given 48 hour period, about half the total number of bacteria then living are destroyed by phages. This dynamic occurs in all ecosystems.

Phages have infected bacteria for billions of years, and just as bacteria mutate to resist drugs, they also mutate to render phages ineffective. However, new phages continually evolve against the mutated bacteria.

SOURCE: Environmental Health Perspectives

Reblogged from mucholderthen, 105 notes, April 14, 2014

delicious-designs:

s’mores donut

delicious-designs:

s’mores donut

Reblogged from delicious-designs, 75 notes, April 13, 2014